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Posts Tagged ‘Vegetarian’

This week I acquired a Crockette, and this was the first meal I made in it. Even though we don’t need our usual type of “Friday Night Dinner” this week because of spring break, I have a feeling this will quickly become a favorite in our Friday-night rotation!

(You can make this in a regular crockpot on the low setting)

Crockette 13-Bean Stew

2/3 cup Lucky 13 Bean Soup, soaked overnight and drained

1 large carrot, cut into 1/4″ pieces

1 medium bell pepper, cut into 1/2″ pieces

1 Tablespoon dried Parsley

1 Tablespoon dried oregano

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1/2 teaspoon onion powder

1/4 teaspoon red pepper flakes

2 cups vegetable broth

Combine all ingredients in Crockette and cook for 10-12 hours. Serves 3.

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Happy Spring!

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'Salad' by Till Nowak

“What do you eat?”

I would think that would be self-explanatory, seeing as I just told you I’m a VEGETarian.
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“Do you still eat chicken?”

Is the Pope Jewish?
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“What about beans?”

Seriously? You’re not clear on if a bean is vegetable or animal? You’ve got bigger concerns than my dietary┬ápreferences, my friend.
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” I know you’re a vegetarian, but would you like to try some cheesesteak/chicken/possum anyway? I won’t tell anyone!”

Yeah, okay. YOU may not tell anyone, but someone is going to know. And that someone is my stomach. And that stomach will punish me in Guantanamo-like ways for my transgression. Your pulled-pork sandwich just doesn’t look like it’s worth that price, sorry.

 

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Stay Tuned for Part II: Not-Stupid Questions People Have Asked Me About Being a Vegetarian!

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I grew up in Northeast Pennsylvania, where most folks eat pork and sauerkraut with mashed potatoes on New Year’s Day (for good luck). Here in the south, the New Year’s tradition is black-eyed peas, greens, and cornbread. Being a vegetarian, I have to say I like the south’s tradition a lot better. ­čÖé

I decided to combine both traditions for our New Year’s day meal. I made a pot of mashed potatoes and sauerkraut for lunch, and for dinner we’ll have peas, cabbage, and my fabulous Mexican cornbread (I still don’t really “get” the allure of cornbread, but I’ve learned to make it really well). The cabbage at dinner is a little redundant (what’s the sauerkraut made of?), but hubs insisted on it.

In my effort to get as many important vitamins into us as possible, I’ve started slipping extra vegetables into just about every dish. Not only is healthy, but it adds a little extra color and flavor to our meals. The mashed potatoes I made came out so colorful and festive-looking that I dubbed them “confetti potatoes.” Give them a try sometime!

8 small red potatoes, unpeeled

1 large carrot, diced

1 large stick celery, diced

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 or 2 vegetable bouillon cubes

3 tablespoons minced fresh spinach

4 tablespoons butter, melted

1/2 cup buttermilk

salt and pepper to taste

Place potatoes, carrots, celery, garlic, and cubes in a large pot with enough water to cover and bring to a boil. Boil uncovered for 20-25 minutes (until vegetables are very soft), then drain.

Mash up the veggies with a potato masher or wooden spoon. Add the spinach, butter, and buttermilk. Mix well, and beat until smooth (I used an electric mixer). Serve with warm sauerkraut and enjoy!

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My husband’s friend alerted him to a great deal on fresh okra at a local market; and my husband came home today with nine pounds of okra.

(photo ganked from Wikipedia)

Aside: I have never eaten an okra in my life, and know nothing about them other than “They’re green and popular in the south.” Now, with nine pounds of the stuff inhabiting my sink, I have to school myself on this green flowering plant really quickly.

Nine pounds of okra is way more than two people could ever possibly need at once, so I’ve looked up how to can them, freeze them, and preserve them with a Foodsaver system. For the rest, I need some good recipes involving the stuff– preferably of the vegetarian, non-fried variety. I know okra with tomatoes is popular, but does anyone have a particular recipe to┬árecommend?

Okera-dokera, that’s all for now.

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